blastortoise:

okay but when you have holocaust survivors and people who were activists during the civil rights movement supporting mike brown and then KKK members and neo nazi’s supporting the officer you should be able to figure out which side is the right one.

(via traversefamilypicnic)

This was posted 12 hours ago. It has 120,412 notes.
fratboysegs:

my favorite tweet at the moment

fratboysegs:

my favorite tweet at the moment

(via f-aolan)

This was posted 14 hours ago. It has 23,062 notes. .

nevver:

“…when you’re looking at live footage of a city in your country where people are being ASSAULTED by the police - side with the people.

(Source: msnbc.com)

This was posted 20 hours ago. It has 16,277 notes.
"He looked at his hands, but the fire in his eyes made him blink."

"He looked at his hands, but the fire in his eyes made him blink."

(Source: marathon.bungie.org)

This was posted 20 hours ago. It has 0 notes. .

cognitivedissonance:

Tonight in Ferguson, Mo. Even CNN is calling out police brutality.

We are watching history unfold. Do not stand down. Spread the word.

No justice, no peace.

(via cockedtail)

This was posted 1 day ago. It has 109,028 notes.

morganjeske:

wip pages for a thing that will be long and meandering!

(via supervillain)

This was posted 1 day ago. It has 274 notes.
MO by KARG Argus Radio

future-punk:

sound cannons just started

This was posted 1 day ago. It has 4 notes.

Ferguson from my TL

thewilsonblog:

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(From what I understand, the police thought they heard a gunshot and started throwing tear gas into the crowd. Correct me if I’m wrong)

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(via aninventoryofthepossible)

This was posted 1 day ago. It has 71,737 notes.

-teesa-:

7.23.14

George Takei describes the moment when he and his family were sent to an internment camp.

(via teantacles)

This was posted 1 day ago. It has 118,523 notes.

warrenellis:

Wounded Knee is empty and quiet. No visitors come to remember. Yet there would be no United States without the persecution and expulsion for which Wounded Knee has become a symbol. At the same time, millions make the pilgrimage to Mt. Rushmore each year to worship “the shrine of democracy.” What do the Native Americans think about this perennial mass tourism that is happening on their own ground? Do the visitors know that the granite spires of the Black Hills into which the presidents were carved are sacred to the Indians of the Midwest? What happens when the perspective is reversed? When a Lakota Indian becomes the director of Mt Rushmore? When white Americans stand at the sober mass grave of slaughtered Indians? How do the tourists confront the abject poverty of the victims’ descendants? How do people live with the presence of the past in the present? Is it possible for America to come to terms with its history? Sacred Ground Trailer Ludwig Schmidtpeter

This was posted 1 day ago. It has 80 notes.